Wednesday, 11 November 2020

Aliens

 

by Jim Bates

hot chocolate

 

Abr and Bnr were two aliens sent to earth on a fact-finding mission from the planet Zerros by the supreme commander, Knx.

            “Find out if the planet is ripe for take over,” Knx told them. Collecting planets was a hobby of his, and he was in the mood to add to his collection.

            “Will do,” Abr said.

            “You can count on us,” added Bnr.

            They left the next day.

The Universal Portal System deposited the two of them onto a subway platform in New York City. After they each instantaneously shape-shifted to resemble humans (Abr wearing kakis and a pink polo shirt and Bnr dressed in skinny jeans and black tee-shirt), they followed the crowd up a long escalator to street level, right in the heart of Manhattan. Immediately they noticed something odd; some people were wearing face mask coverings and others weren’t.

Abr whispered to Bnr, “What’s going on?”

Bnr sniffed, “Maybe it’s because the air smells so bad.”

Abr held his nose and nodded. “Probably, but I’m going to find out for sure.” He put out his arm and stopped a young man sauntering by carrying a skateboard. “Excuse me. Could you please tell us why some people are wearing those things on their face?”

The young man had dreadlocks and wore a red tee-shirt and baggy pants. He gave them a perplexed look. “You mean, masks? Haven’t you heard about the pandemic?”

Neither of them had a clue but Bnr was quick to play along. “A little, but tell us what you know.”

“Okay,” he said, agreeably. “It began in China in 2019 and spread around the world from there. It got bad here in the states in March of 2020 and has stayed bad ever since.”

“Wow!” Bnr exclaimed. “That’s about…”

“Yeah, it’s been over two years, now. Wearing a mask has helped slow the spread of the virus.”

Abr asked, “Why doesn’t everyone wear one?”

The young man shrugged, flipped his dreadlocks back onto his shoulder and said, “Because they’re idiots.” He put down his skateboard, stepped on and skated off down the sidewalk.

Abr and Bnr watched him weave in and out of the crowd.

“We should get masks,” Abr said. “To be on the safe side.”

“Yes, we should,” Bnr agreed. “And to fit in. Say, I have an idea. Let’s try an experiment.”

“What do you have in mind?”

“Why don’t you wear a mask and I won’t. We’ll see if it makes a difference.”

“Sounds good,” Abr said. “I’d like a black one like the guy we talked to had.”

“Great,” Bnr said. “Let’s go get you one.”    

One year later, Bnr, the non-mask wearing alien, returned alone to Zerros. After he completed his initial de-briefing, the supreme commander summoned him. “What happened? Why’d you come back alone? Did Abr die even though he was wearing one of those ridiculous masks?” He laughed, “Abr was always kind of a gullible sort.”

            “No,” Bnr was quick to respond. “The mask helped him a lot. He never got sick.” Then he grinned sheepishly. “On the other hand, I got the virus and almost died. It was touch and go for a while, but,” he pointed to himself, “as you can see, I made it back just fine.”

            Knx was unimpressed. “Whatever…Getting back to Abr, if he’s not dead, why didn’t he come back with you?”

            “You’ll never believe it, sir.”

            “What?”

            Bnr grinned. “He met a lady.”

            “Impossible. You scientists aren’t supposed fall for that kind of nonsense. You’re all about the science. Research. Facts. Testing and more testing. You don’t have time for romance.”

            Bnr grinned even more. “Never-the-less, sir, that’s what happened. ‘Hook, line and sinker’ is the expression they use on earth. ‘The whole kit-and-caboodle.’ The…’’

            “All right! I get your drift.”

            “He’s in love, sir.”

            “What! What kind of stupid thing is that to say? Love. It’s a bunch of…,” Knx was beside himself, not one inclined toward anything to do with amorous intentions. “It’s a bunch of crap, that’s what it is.”

            “He’s really smitten, sir. It’s pretty emotional for him, too, and he’s not used to dealing with feelings.”

            “I should say not.”

            “And it’s complicated.”

            “How so?” The supreme commander was on shaky ground when it came to talking about love.

            “Well, she’s brilliant. She stands in the harbor of New York City and is kind of a beacon for liberty. She’s got a lot of responsibility.”

            “I can imagine.”

            “Yes. She’s made of metal and Abr adores her. He’s with her all the time taking care of her, cleaning her and watching out for her. She doesn’t move much. Plus, she’s kind of quiet, but he enjoys talking to her even if she doesn’t talk back. Like I said, he’s very smitten.”

            “Even with this pandemic going on he’s not worried about getting sick?”

            “No, sir. He wears his mask. He’s being safe. He’s very happy.”

            Knx was quiet for a moment. Then he sighed, giving Abr up as a lost cause, and focused on Bnr. “Okay, then. What about the mission to take over the planet? You were there for a year. Should we attack now?”

            “No, sir. I’d wait. The pandemic will kill many more people, especially if they persist in not following the guidelines. It’s inevitable. After that happens it’ll make dealing with them that much easier. Less people to worry about.”

            “That makes sense.”

            “Thank you, sir.” Bnr was quiet for a moment and then added. “Sir, if you don’t mind. I have an idea.”

            “About what?”
            “Speeding along the takeover.”

            Knx was not a patient man. “Get to the point, Bnr.”

            “Well, sir, I looked into getting a job at one of the pharmaceutical companies that’s working on making a vaccine.”

            Knx was intrigued. “Yes?”

“You know with my credentials I’m a very good scientist, right?”

“The point, Bnr.”

“Well, I’ve done a bit of research. I can make the vaccine look like it will work, but, in reality, it won’t work. People will be excited to take the vaccine, but it won’t help them. More people will die and it’ll throw the world into chaos.”

“You sure you can do that?”

“Piece-of-cake, sir,” to use an expression on earth.

Knx grimaced. “They sound like an odd bunch.”
            “They are, sir. Extremely.”

“So, you get a job with a pharmaceutical company and mess up the vaccine. Right?

“Yes.”

“The pandemic goes on and people keep dying because the vaccine doesn’t work.
            “Yes, sir. And chaos ensures.”

“And the takeover is easier. It’s brilliant, Bnr.”

“Thank you, sir.”

Knx was silent, grinning, thinking about adding another planet to his collect. Life was good.

“Um, sir?” Bnr asked.

“What?”

“When do you want me to leave?”

“As soon as possible.”

“I’ll go tomorrow.”

“Good.” Bnr stood to leave. “Oh, and, Bnr.”

“What, sir?”

“Don’t get hung up doing what Abr is doing.”

“Oh, I won’t. It’s not good science.”

Knx smiled. He was liking Bnr more and more.

About the author 

Jim lives in a small town twenty miles west of Minneapolis, Minnesota. His stories and poems have appeared in over two-hundred online and print publications. His collection of short stories, Resilience, is scheduled to be published in 2020 by Bridge House Publishing. All of his stories can be found on his blog:  www.theviewfromlonglake.wordpress.com  His story “Aliens” has been nominated this year for the Pushcart Prize in flash fiction.

 

 

 

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